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The Messed Up Truth About The Borg From Star Trek

Like everything in the Star Trek universe, the Borg are not nearly as black and white as they appear. That’s not to say you’d want a Borg cube for your Neutral Zone neighbor, though, as there are some pretty weird aspects to these Star Trek villains.

The Borg made their first appearance in Star Trek canon in the second season of The Next Generation, and like so many problems faced by the Enterprise, it was all Q’s fault.

After Captain Picard declines Q’s offer to join the crew, the omnipotent trickster flings the Enterprise across the universe into an unknown sector of space that just happens to be the heart of Borg territory. Instead of turning around and hightailing it back to the nearest starbase, Jean-Luc decides to poke around a little bit, and the crew soon find themselves face-to-face with the ominously iconic Borg cube. Naturally, our heroes try to make peaceful contact, but the Borg are not that kind of collective. They catch the Enterprise in a tractor beam and carve off a piece like a birthday cake, killing or abducting 18 members of the crew, and proving themselves to be more than a match for the Enterprise’s defenses.

Deciding that they need a new strategy, Commander William Riker takes a small away team to visit the Borg on their home turf. Given what Q has told the Enterprise about the Borg, one might expect the drones – Borg temporarily disconnected from the collective – to go into attack mode immediately when they spot the Starfleet officers aboard their ship. Instead, Riker and his pals are largely ignored, left to explore the cube without being hassled. Why? Because the Borg are busy repairing their ship, and can’t be bothered with any of these tasty Starfleet Officers. Clearly, they don’t think these guys cut it, and aren’t worth the three extra seconds of not fixing their ride it would take to assimilate them.

Ouch. Sorry, Riker. Klingon apologies, Worf. Not only are they a frightening presence from Day One, they’re also kind of a bunch of snobs. And forget about it if you’re a Kazon.

Watch the video for more of The Messed Up Truth About The Borg From Star Trek!

#StarTrek #Borg

Rejected | 0:12
Listen to Guinan! | 1:50
Resistance is futile… maybe | 2:49
Hugh, man | 4:13

Video transcription:

Like everything in the Star Trek universe,
the Borg are not nearly as black and whiteas they appear.That's not to say you'd want a Borg cube for
your Neutral Zone neighbor, though, as thereare some pretty weird aspects to these Star
Trek villains.The Borg made their first appearance in Star
Trek canon in the second season of The NextGeneration, and like so many problems faced
by the Enterprise, it was all Q's fault."Mon capitaine, he's back!"After Captain Picard declines Q's offer to
join the crew, the omnipotent trickster flingsthe Enterprise across the universe into an
unknown sector of space that just happensto be the heart of Borg territory.Instead of turning around and hightailing
it back to the nearest starbase, Jean-Lucdecides to poke around a little bit, and the
crew soon find themselves face-to-face withthe ominously iconic Borg cube.Naturally, our heroes try to make peaceful
contact, but the Borg are not that kind ofcollective.They catch the Enterprise in a tractor beam
and carve off a piece like a birthday cake,killing or abducting 18 members of the crew,
and proving themselves to be more than a matchfor the Enterprise's defenses.Deciding that they need a new strategy, Commander
William Riker takes a small away team to visitthe Borg on their home turf.Given what Q has told the Enterprise about
the Borg, one might expect the drones – Borgtemporarily disconnected from the collective
– to go into attack mode immediately whenthey spot the Starfleet officers aboard their
ship.Instead, Riker and his pals are largely ignored,
left to explore the cube without being hassled.Why?Because the Borg are busy repairing their
ship, and can't be bothered with any of thesetasty Starfleet Officers.Clearly, they don't think these guys cut it,
and aren't worth the three extra seconds ofnot fixing their ride it would take to assimilate
them.Ouch.Sorry, Riker.Klingon apologies, Worf.Not only are they a frightening presence from
Day One, they're also kind of a bunch of snobs.And forget about it if you're a Kazon."Were they assimilated?”“Their biological and technological distinctiveness
was unremarkable.They were unworthy of assimilation."One of the things that makes the Borg so terrifying
during their introduction is that they'recompletely unknown to the crew of the Enterprise.Well, almost completely.Guinan,the Enterprise's wise, mysterious,
and seemingly immortal bartender played byWhoopi Goldberg, knows quite a bit about them.As she tells Captain Picard, they killed her
people, and he absolutely should not be messingwith them.According to her, they're not on the same
level as the Romulans, the Ferengi, or eventhe Klingon Empire.The Borg are a whole new ballgame.But, as so often happens when a woman speaks
truth to power, her warnings fall on deafears.When Picard decides to reason with and then
attack the Borg, he not only loses a handfulof his own crew members and a hefty section
of his ship, he winds up sparking their interestin the Alpha Quadrant, leading to the devastating
conflict that plays out throughout the seriesand even through the time stream itself.Picard eventually learns what we knew all
along, and pays the price for it: Guinan wasright.The Borg are, indeed, a different kind of
villain, an unstoppable foe that they'll beforced to reckon with, time and time again,
with devastating consequences.In the Next Gen film, First Contact, the Borg
order the Federation ships opposing them tolower their shields and surrender with this
warm and fuzzy greeting:"Your culture will adapt to service us.Resistance is futile."Considering the Borg's overwhelming offensive
powers, it's about as good an offer as mostcivilizations are going to get.It seems like there's no one who would be
able to put up a fight against such an intimidatingenemy.Of course, loyal fans know that resistance
isn't quite as futile as the Borg would likeyou to think.We've seen several instances of someone successfully
fighting off the Borg, the first being CaptainPicard.After being assimilated into the collective
in the iconic two-part episode "The Best ofBoth Worlds," he was restored to himself after
a meeting of the minds with Data.Later, we learn about Species 8427, an enemy
even more menacing and cruel than the Borg."Over the past five months, the Borg have
been attacked by them on at least a dozenoccasions.Each time, the Borg were defeated swiftly."Captain Janeway of the Voyager attempts to
trade their secret biological weapons to theBorg in return for safe passage through the
Collective's territory.This all happens during a violent, devastating
war between the Borg and Species 8427 whichensnares the Voyager crew.It's so intense that Janeway, Seven of Nine,
and the Voyager's hologram doctor have togo to rather spectacular lengths to emerge
from the Borg's clutches relatively unscathed.Clearly, resistance to the Borg isn't entirely
futile.It's just really difficult and requires a
lot of gymnastics on the part of the writers.Thanks to her experience patching up Captain
Picard after his tenure as Locutus, Dr. BeverlyCrusher has a surprisingly good track record
of restoring humanity to the drones absorbedby the Borg collective.Of course, few Starfleet medical officers
would've had the chance to try their handat it even once, but Crusher pulls it off
a second time when the Enterprise encountersHugh, a solitary Borg drone, disconnected
from the rest of the Collective and rescuedon the fringes of Federation space.Picard, having had his own traumatic brushes
with the Borg in earlier episodes, would likenothing more than to keep Hugh, the Borg formerly
known as Third of Five, in the brig, and evenentertains the idea of using him as a Trojan
Horse to wipe out the entire collective witha virus.Crusher, however, insists he be treated like
any other sick patient, and she slowly nurseshim back to health.Inspired by their own cybernetic pal, Data,
the rest of the Enterprise embraces Hugh aswell, helping him cope with life outside the
collective.He begins to develop an individual mindset,
succeeding in convincing even Captain Picardthat Borg can be rehabilitated.Hugh eventually returns to his cube, a changed
Borg.Hugh's new individuality manages to infect
the rest of his Cube's unified hearts andminds, causing so much disarray that it falls
into the sinister hands of Lore, Data's blacksheep brother.Hugh does, however, eventually triumph over
Lore, in part because of his ability to disconnectfrom the collective and think on his own.As Star Trek's first sympathetic portrayal
of a Borg drone, Hugh sets the stage for Sevenof Nine, and a longer, deeper exploration
of what it means to be human, Borg, and acreature stuck somewhere in between.Check out one of our newest videos right here!Plus, even more Grunge videos about your favorite
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