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MVI 0669 – Classic Game Room – Xevious Review for XBOX 360

The game is on – Classic Game Room – Xevious Review for XBOX 360: Beginning production in early 1998 for the 1999 model, the Ford F-Series Super Duty consisted of the F-250 pickup truck, F-350 pickup truck and chassis cab, and introduced the F-450 and F-550 chassis cab trucks (see below). The Super Duty trucks would be produced with three cab configurations: two-door standard cab, 2+2 door SuperCab, and four-door crew cab. The SuperCab configuration of the Super Duty marked the introduction of two standard rear-hinged doors on the extended cab, a feature also adopted by the F-150 and Ranger/Mazda B-Series for 1999. The standard cab was produced with an 8-foot bed; SuperCab and crew cabs were produced with a 6 3/4-foot bed, with an 8-foot bed optional. Two-wheel drive was standard, with four-wheel drive as an option; on F-350 pickup trucks, a dual rear-wheel axle was optional with either drive configuration.

Styled by Andrew Jacobson (designer of the 1997 Ford F-150) and Moray Callum,[5] aside from taillamp lenses and the tailgate, the Super Duty F-Series trucks share no visible exterior parts with the Ford F-150. Under the skin, only the base-equipment 5.4L V8 and 4R100 transmission are shared. While sharing the similar aerodynamic cab design of its smaller counterpart, the exterior of the Super Duty trucks are much different forward of the windshield. While an influence often compared to the 1994–2002 Dodge Ram, the Super Duty also derives elements of styling from much larger Ford trucks, including the Ford LTL-9000 and Aeromax, with a raised hoodline, large grille, and low fenders. A feature drawn from 1996 redesign of the Louisville/Aeromax was in the design of the side window openings: the front portion is lowered, allowing for increased side visibility (as well as larger sideview mirrors). To improve aerodynamics over metal-framed mirrors, manual-telescoping trailer tow mirrors were available as an option. As an industry first, 2 large complete ring-style front tow hooks were included. A minor update occurred in the 2002 model year which saw a new instrument cluster with a digital odometer.

For the 2005 model year, the Ford Super Duty trucks were given exterior and interior updates. For the exterior, a new grille, front bumper, and headlights were introduced alongside the introduction of a locking tailgate for all pickup trucks. Under the skin (with thicker frame rails), updated Triton gasoline engines were introduced with higher engine output and larger alternators; in response to the increased power, all trucks were given 4-wheel disc brakes (with two-piston calipers). To accommodate the larger brakes, 17-inch wheels became standard, with 18-inch wheels optional (on single rear-wheel trucks); forged Alcoa wheels were an option. The long-running Twin I-Beam front suspension continued on two-wheel drive trucks.

To the interior, several changes were made to improve functionality for end-users. Along with the addition of a driver-side glove compartment, the truck added the option of dashboard-mounted auxiliary switches (for owners who fit equipment such as snowplows, winches, and auxiliary lights); these are switches that were typically user designed. For users that tow, a new option was Ford TowCommand, a Trailer brake controller built into the dashboard, allowing it to integrate with the ABS system and engine computer from the factory.

During its production, the first-generation Ford F-Series Super Duty was sold with two gasoline and two diesel engines.

Replacing the overhead-valve engines used in previous F-Series models, for the Super Duty, Ford transitioned to the Triton overhead-cam engine family (truck versions of the Ford Modular engines).

At its launch, the standard engine in the Super Duty was a Triton V8. Producing 255 hp/350 lb-ft of torque, the SOHC 16-valve V8 was shared with the F-150 and Ford E-Series. During 1999, the engine was retuned to 260 hp. In 2005, the cylinder heads were redesigned to 3-valve design, converting it to a 24-valve V8; output was increased to 300 hp/365 lb-ft of torque.

As a replacement for the long-running 7.5L/460 V8, for the Super Duty, Ford introduced a Triton V10. A SOHC 20-valve engine, the V10 produced 310 hp/425 lb-ft of torque. In 2005, the V10 would also receive 3-valve cylinder heads, increasing its output to 362 hp/457 lb-ft of torque.

Both the V8 and V10 Triton engines are designed with a fail-safe cooling system to protect the engine in case of major coolant loss. If the engine overheats, the engine will operate on half of its cylinders. Alternating back and forth between each set of 4 (or 5) pistons, the set that is not receiving fuel and ignition is operating to pump air through the engine to lower its temperature.

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